What is Zentangle?
Linda Farmer, Certified Zentangle Teacher

The Zentangle® art form and method was created by Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas and is copyrighted. Zentangle® is a registered trademark of Zentangle, Inc. Learn more at zentangle.com.

MY COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Is posted on the bottom of every page and described on this page.

Creative Commons License
TanglePatterns.com is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

TANGLE SELECTOR

Use this Random Tangle Selector with your TanglePatterns.com TANGLE GUIDE, 2014 Edition to help you select tangles. See Page 4 of the Guide for instructions. You can also use this to select random Strings.

COOL TOOLS FOR YOUR TANGLES …

Free Delivery on all Books at the Book Depository

TANGLES BY ARTIST

abigaill adeleb agnetal alyssa amyb angies angiev angiew anitarl annah annekevd annem annets anng antoninem arjadlh barbaraf beths bjt bradh bunnyw carenm carladp caroleo carolion carolync cathyc cathyc2 cathys celian challenge cherylc cherylr cherylw chrisg chrissief christinav christiner cindyp cindys clairew conniet connyh cookies copyright dannio davedl davidr deannesm debbiep debrac deniser diamond grid dianas dianel dianet diannek didierg donnab donnah edenh elenah erino estherp faithc genevievec georgik gravatar guide heidic helenw hollym hope idil jacquelinej janar janed janeileenm janem janemac janices jeannez jellav jemm jenniferc jenniferh jjl jodif jonathanb josem joyceb joycee judyb judym juliee julieth karis karls karryh katea katem kathyb katya kelleyk kristyt ksenijav kymb laraw laurah laural lauras laurier lenau lesleysg lesliec lilap lindad lindaf lindar lisah lisas liviac lorih lorim lyndelc lynnh lynnm magdaw margaretb marietl marizaanvb maryannsd maryem maryk marym marys maureens meihuat melissah micheleb mikeeh milestones mimil mollyh nancyd nancyn nancyp nathaliem normab nzjo ogee grid pampw patriciac pattig pattym pegf refresher reneek ritan ronnies roseb ruthh sadellew sandras sandyb sandyh sarab sayantikar sharonc sharonr shauna shawnh shellyb shoshi simoneb stephaniek stephanies store suec suej sueo susang susanp susans susiea suzannem suzannew tangle guide teresac terrib terrig theresag thomasg tip tips tonih triciaf trishw tutorial verag vickib vickim wayneh yamitf zendala zone zentangle zoeb

Archives

How to use this site

Be sure to explore all the tabs at the very top of the page, there’s a lot of great information in there. Some suggestions for articles you might have missed were recently posted here.

1. Learn what Zentangle® is all about (it’s not doodling!)

  • by visiting the ZENTANGLES > WHAT IS A ZENTANGLE page
  • by purchasing the TanglePatterns.com BEGINNER’S GUIDE to Zentangle® from the STORE > EBOOKS page (also available in French and Spanish editions)

2. Learn this art form’s terminology

  • by visiting the ZENTANGLES > ZENTANGLE TERMINOLOGY page

3. Learn about the Official Tangle Patterns

  • by visiting the ZENTANGLES > LINDA’S LIST OF OFFICIAL TANGLES page
  • the official tangles are those created by Rick Roberts, Maria Thomas, and Molly Hollibaugh (Zentangle)

4. Learn what makes a pattern a tangle

  • by visiting the ZENTANGLES > A PATTERN IS NOT ALWAYS A TANGLE page

5. Explore the tangle patterns on this site (now well over 600)

  • see the explanations below about how the site is organized
  • get your personal copy of the latest edition of the TanglePatterns.com TANGLE GUIDE by visiting the STORE > EBOOKS page
  • learn more about the Guide on the BOOK REVIEWS > TANGLEPATTERNS.COM TANGLE GUIDE page

6. Explore the TUTORIALS on the site

  • by visiting the TUTORIALS tab on the pink alphabetic menu bar under the scrolling images of the tangles

7. TANGLE, TANGLE, TANGLE!

  • like Nike® says, “Just do it!”
  • go back to Step 1 if you need instructions :-)

* * * * * * * * * * * *

HOW THE SITE IS ORGANIZED

Tangle patterns can be found simply by …

  • clicking on a letter of the alphabet in the pink alphabetic menu bar above
  • then,
    • a page will come up with the entire list of tangle patterns that begin with that letter
    • click on the “Continue reading” link  OR
    • click on the Title of the tangle pattern you wish to view
    • either will take you to the post about the pattern and links to illustrated instructions on how to draw the pattern.

Tangle patterns can also be found by their tag in the Find Patterns by Tag section on the left side of the page …

  • click on the tag you’re interested in and all the tangle patterns tagged with that name will come up on a single page
  • click on the “Continue Reading” link  OR
  • click on the Title of the tangle pattern you wish to view
  • either will take you to the post about the pattern and its links to illustrated instructions on how to draw the pattern.

Pattern Identifier in the Page Headers

As patterns are added to the site they are added to the scrolling images at the top of the page.

Patterns designated with an asterisk (eg. tortuca*) need an explanation: these do not have online instructions so they do not have a page on TanglePatterns. Usually they are official Zentangle® patterns. I’ve included these patterns for identification purposes – and because I enjoyed drawing them. When and if online instructions become available, they will be added to the site just like the rest of the patterns.

Tangle Pattern Tag Definitions

Here’s what some of the pattern tags mean:

  • zentangle = patterns created and illustrated by Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas. These are “official” Zentangle® patterns
  • mollyh = patterns created by Molly Hollibaugh, CZT® (usually illustrated by Maria Thomas)
  • sandyb = patterns created and/or original designs illustrated by Sandy Bartholomew, CZT®
  • dianel = patterns created and/or original designs illustrated by Diane LaChance, CZT®

You can also find tangle patterns tagged by type as well as its creator or illustrator. For example: circles, dots, spirals, squares, those based on a grid and so on. Those tags are also in the left sidebar.

If you have any suggestions or requests, please feel free to add them in the comments.

34 comments to How to use this site

  • Carolyn Mitchell

    I would like to be able to find the names of zentangles illustrated at the top of the site…is that possible?
    thanks

    • Linda Farmer

      Hi Carolyn, you are not alone in making this request and I do recognize the need. Right now it isn’t possible, the only way is to page through the patterns alphabetically until you see the one you’re interested in. But there’s good news: I am working on adding a slideshow feature that will allow you to click through to the pattern page. Should be ready in the next couple of weeks – it takes a lot of programming time to set it up because of the total number of Zentangle patterns I have on the site.

      UPDATE: October 2010 – pattern names have been added to the images at the top of the page. Confession: I gave up on the slideshow, it was taking way too long to create.

  • Pamelyn

    Is there an easy way to draw a five pointed star that is open in the middle?

  • Dayle Mathis

    Dayle Mathis
    December 31, 2010 at 1:00 pm · Reply

    Just wanted to share some things. I figure I am not the only one here on a very strict income. Well, I have found a way to make the most of my Zentangling. I bought a SMALL spiral, lined notepad (5×7), at the dollar area of Target, or at any dollar store. Each page can break down into 4 squares, 6 squares, even 8 squares. I use this for the step-by-step instructions on each design. I put the name of the pattern and designer on each page. There are 50 sheets, so that’s 50 patterns. I don’t use both sides, because I do the instructions just as they are done originally, with colored pens and all. I also bought a small (5×7) hard cover, string binded, plain sheet journal, also 50 pages, also at any dollar store, or clearance bin almost anywhere. I use this for my designs, using the patterns I have learned in my spiril notebook. These are both small enough to fit into my Zentangle Kit. I was able to get a set of Extra Fine Tip permanent marker pens (Precise V5 from Pilot, rolling ball), at Walmart, for less then Amazon. I paid under $5.00 for a package with black, red, green, and blue. They are perfect for the step-by-step patterns, don’t bleed, dry almost immediately, (so when your in the zone drawing, you don’t end up with ink all over the side of your hand), and the tip is high quality, no feathering at all. I use these every day, and can’t believe how good they are! Whenever I go out, I throw my pens in the side pocket of my bag, grab my two pattern books, throw them in my bag, and I’m on my way. Sometimes I’ll take my Kit, depending on how long my day will be. I also make designs of things I see throughout the day that look like a Zentangle pattern, on the opposite end of my spiril journal. So, to get started with my own work, or studying new patterns, I spent about $8.00. A small plastic ruler is nice to have as well, and although mistakes don’t exist, I carry a pencil size eraser, usually less then $1.00 anywhere you can get pencils, pens, etc. Like many others I enjoy preparing my spiril notebook with the squares and dots, ready at any time to start a new pattern. I try to draw a quick Zentangle after I have done the instructions for each pattern I learn, the more you use the patterns, the better you get at them. I always keep my Zentangle tools by my computer, and mess around each morning while I am reading my emails. So when I get to the new emailed pattern, I’m ready to go.

    I do keep a wish list on Amazon. It includes books, journals, pens, felt tips, pencils, anything I see or hear about that I’d like to try or research regarding my Zentangling. But I also keep a hard copy in my bag. I have saved tons this way. I found an entire set of ultra fine point, permanent Sharpie’s for quite a bit less then Amazon, and snapped them up. There are 24 colors in the pack, and it was a little over $11.00. What a deal! They don’t bleed outside your pattern, and even with my inexpensive little $1.00 journal there is no bleeding through to the next page. This month I was able to order some of my wish list products from Amazon, and can’t wait for delivery. Even then, I scored. I ordered “Totally Tangled” by SSB, a Moleskine Large Sketchbook, and Sakura Glaze Pens, 10-pack, all for $33.60, free shipping!

    OK, one more thing to share. I do a lot of crafts, or I should say I have a lot of craft material and books. When I am stuck for an idea for a pattern, or just need some inspiration, I look through my craft books. My polymer Clay book is great for that, as are the Altered books I have. And it works in reverse too, some Zentangle patterns give me inspiration for beadwork, hemp or string patterns, the possibilities are endless. I also have a program on my computer that is visualization with music, it is called SoundSpectrum. What a magical door to Zentangle patterns! You can download free trials of these visualizations, they are fun to watch with music, and form great ideas for Zentangle patterns. Check it out. So, if you love Zentangle, but can barely rub two cents together, check out some of my ideas. You’d be surprised at what treasures you can find. Hope I helped to break some of you out of your “spending” comfort zone. Art Saves Lives!

    Best Regards,
    Dayle Mathis

  • Matthew

    Thanks Dayle- I was just thinking that you really don’t need to buy the Zentangle ™ kit to get started, but the DVD part of it might be very helpful. I wanted to mention that I’m getting good results from Pitt pens, just the basic set of four. My journal is Bienfang, 100 sheets 11 x 14, very reasonable price & good paper.

  • Sandy Monroe

    Thank you Dayle for the information on the pens and notebooks… I am just starting and need all the tips and hints I can get… thank you again

  • Pamela Keown

    Thank You DAYLE! I WANT the Zentangle kit but my husband has been unemployed over eighteen months – I have been doodling – floundering – thinking I had to have the kit before I could start – so with your frugal suggestions I will start! Thank you very much.

  • Carol

    I’m wondering what the asterisk means by some patterns and why they are not available for drawing? Please advise. Thank you very much. This website is absolutely phenomenal…appreciated. I’ve taken a certified class which gave me a great start. Your site is much better than taking a book and knowing nothing at all… THANKS!

  • gmsmg

    DAYLE where did you get the sharpie’s 24 color from thank for the help. P.S. I think I’m male that likes to tangle. And how about a little help $$$$$ for LINDA.
    Jerry

  • Lyn

    Hi, I’m new here and to zentangles and have been playing around filling in shapes, leaves, fish etc, and been having fun.I’m wondering if I’m allowed to show what I’ve done seeing it’s not tiles and where I go to do this if allowed. I’m rather enjoying this different kind of art form and find it’s addictive.
    Lyn

    • Linda Farmer

      Welcome Lyn, many people share their creations in the Zentangle group on flickr. In the beginnings of that group it was mostly Zentangle tiles being posted, but now you’ll hardly ever find an actual Zentangle. There’s a ton of Zentangle-inspired drawings.

      I confess that with some postings I don’t see the Zentangle connection at all, but it’s not a moderated group so anything can be posted there. From that perspective it can be a bit misleading for people new to Zentangle if they’re looking to learn about the art form by example. But the creative enthusiasm is certainly there!

  • Jane A

    Hi LInda!
    Wonderful site – so wonderful, that I just donated, and now have the fantastic 2012 Tangle Guide, which is fantastic, thank you.

    I just wondered why there are some blank spaces? I counted about 55 that are labelled squares, but are completely blank?

    All good wishes from a very happy tangling family in the UK
    J x

  • Cristina A Ross

    I read page 2 of the Tangle Guide, and understand that you want the teachers to have some resources left to teach. However, sometimes there are no teachers in some parts of the country (or world) where people may live, which means those tangles are not accessible/able to be learned. I would love to take a class online if there are any available, as there are no classes in my area. What are the possibilities for this?

    Cris

    • Linda Farmer

      Hi Cris,
      It is unlikely there will be online classes largely because the Zentangle® method is a very personal, interactive experience with the instructor and that interactivity can’t happen with a recording.

      However, the next best thing is to get an Official Kit because Maria Thomas’s instructional DVD in it is very good. I describe the Kit in detail here.

      I’m sure this is a little disappointing but in addition to the tangles included in the Kit, there are lots of official tangles that are available online and they’re all in my TANGLE GUIDE. Sandy Bartholomew’s AlphaTangle also illustrates several that you won’t find elsewhere, although there are no instructions.

  • Cindy

    Hi Linda, I have been trying to puzzle through this question, and finally decided to ask an expert :-). I read that “if it is an identifiable object it is not zentangle.” Well…not that quote exactly, but you get the idea. So here is my question. I have seen amazing work using….a fish outline…birds…etc. Are these not considered Zentangle because “the string” is actually an identifiable “object?” Just curious. I’ll go back to my 3.5″ squares now :-). You have a fantastic site, by the way, and I love the pdf book of patterns!

    • Linda Farmer

      Hi Cindy, hmmm tough question to answer but I’ll have a go strictly from my personal perspective, and I make no bones about the fact that I’m a Zentangle purist.

      What you describe isn’t Zentangle as I understand it. The “identifiable objects” change Zentangle from a fine, meditative, abstract art, to conscious “picture-making” and it doesn’t appeal to me aesthetically.

      But it honestly doesn’t matter what I think, it is completely a matter of personal taste and what makes the person creating it happy. If it brings that person satisfaction and a sense of accomplishment and it appeals to them, that’s great. The process is what it’s all about and we all have very different tastes.

      For me, Zentangle isn’t art that “says something”. It is art that through its abstract beauty just IS.

  • Cindy

    That is a great answer. I am still (obviously) trying to put the pieces together, so to speak. Thanks!

  • Joyce Blodgett

    To Pamela Keown…

    Because my hours at work have been reduced (economy, what else?!), I’ve been looking for alternatives to the wonderful Zentangle tiles; I prefer to practice on anything else, and use the tiles for the finished patterns I want to lay down.

    I found that certain wall calendars used in offices, etc. (I work in the ICU of a hospital, so get them every month, FREE, because it’s part of my job to remove the old ones and hang the new ones) are just great for all the practice I can think of. If they have photos on them, so much the better because you can ‘tangle right over the cut up photo, and you have a terrific background…well, you have to see it to believe it. They have to be matte finish, though, not slick.

    But this economy forces us–me–to use my ingenuity and find as many free (but still high quality) papers to practice on; I just made several mosaic-style tiles from a cut up calendar, and they look great.

  • Joyce Blodgett

    Hi Linda,

    I have a question; I’m making greeting cards (generic, nothing specific) as part of a fundraiser for my Church, and I’d like to use Zentangle patterns. I’ve figured out borders, etc., that I’d like to use, but am concerned about copyright infringement. My CZT said that she’s not sure all the designs can be copyrighted since they’re up for personal interpretation, but also to check with someone who has been doing/teaching Zentangle for longer than she has.

    Could you guide me in this, please? Some of the patterns I’d like to use are yours, so I certainly don’t want to run into any kind of legal issues–that would not be the least bit acceptable to either me, or the Church.

    I have a little time–a couple months–before the event, so if there is something I need to do to keep this all legal, I’ll wait for an answer, and then do what I have to do.

    Thank you for your guidance in this.

    • Linda Farmer

      Hi Joyce,
      Bearing in mind that I’m not an attorney, or any kind of expert about this – generally speaking, if you are using the patterns in your own original artwork, there is no copyright infringement. You are creating something new and original. However, if you are copying (reproducing) someone else’s art in whole or in part, that is copyright infringement.

      It’s always nice, where possible, to credit your source. For instance many people are now creating Zentangle-inspired greeting cards for retail sale. My personal opinion is that in this case a credit line on the back of the card acknowledging Zentangle is appropriate and respectful. Something along the lines of “Inspired by Zentangle®” would work nicely.

      The copyright infringement issue on the web happens (way too often) when someone takes an image from another site (for example, pattern steps) and posts it on their own – that is copyright infringement. Explicit permission must be obtained first to use another person’s intellectual/creative property. This is where Pinterest is a genuine problem for artists of any kind. And that’s a whole other can of ethical worms.

  • Joyce Blodgett

    Hi Linda,

    Thank you for your reply; it truly does help, because all my cards are going to be hand drawn by me, but I would like to give credit where credit is due (my parents were strict believers in doing so, and instilled that in every one of their children). I’ll design a nifty little credit line for the back of the cards.

    Knowing to Whom I would have to answer–no lame excuses accepted in God’s eyes–means I want to be very, very careful!

  • milan cronovich

    I have been doodling for over 40 years. Little did I know until recently that some of my drawings look like and can be called Zentangles. I make original (or so I thought) drawings to sell. After reading some of the copyright comments, how would I go about figuring out if what I think I have created looks similar to something someone else created and might be copyrighted….unless i search through who knows how many patterns somewhere.
    Please shed some light on this.
    thanks
    milan (mee-lon)

  • Grace McIntyre

    Hi Linda, I want to begin to sell some of my tangle art drawings but am not sure where I stand using tangle patterns in the art that belong to other people. For instance, I have drawn the Sydney Opera House in white on black and put tangle patterns over it. As it is a tourist attraction in NSW Australia it will have a tourist market and should sell well. (Consider tangling the Statue of Liberty or the Empire State Building?) However I have used patterns off the Tangle Pattern website that other people have created. Am I in breach of copy right by selling the art works? Thanks, Grace

  • Hi Linda,
    I am trying to find instructions for adding a raised gold-leaf embossed letter to one of my “creations”. My best example is the single gold letter that Maria included in the “group tangle” at CZT seminar. Any suggestions for sources would be welcome.
    Thanks for all of your effort – your site is the best!
    Karen CZT 6

  • Catherine Northcott

    Please unsubscribe me from your wonderful site. I can no longer receive personal e-mail at this address. ):

    • Linda Farmer

      Hi Catherine, to unsubscribe please use the link in at the bottom of any of your old emails. The service is run by Google Feedburner and for your own spam protection I’m not able to add or change subscriptions.

  • goretti

    Hi Linda,
    just a belated note to thank you for all your dedication, work & patience …!
    I got my Tangle patterns book and I love it, so much so that nothing escapes a Tangle around here, even my husband keeps moving around just in case ….!
    I got my students ( of Italian, 8 to 12 years old ) into experimenting with drawing patterns (not necessarily Zentangle inspired) to fill in spaces or to add to sheets that I give them to colour in.
    They love it, and both boys & girls are amazed that they have created such beautiful & interesting “art work”. This has been a very positive outcome to these kids who because of new technologies, usually are not required to develop the simple skills I developed when there was no pre cut, pre sketched or pre coloured materials …
    Soon I will send you some photos to illustrate these “phenomenon” !

    Thank you so much.

    Goretti aka Girasole Giallo on Flicker

  • rueyeet

    Something that would be very cool…a “random tangle” link that would take you to a different random one of the site’s tangles when you clicked it.
    It’d be like one of the legends in the Zentangle kits, except with 500-plus tangles instead of 20!

  • Cara

    I, too, would love to see a “random tangle” button. That would really be wonderful!

    • Linda Farmer, CZT

      Hi Cara, that’s beyond my technical capabilities, however every pattern on the site has a section at the end of it called “You might also like” that displays five posts from the site and you could use the patterns there as your random selector.

  • Joyce Blodgett

    I found that suggestion to be interesting; I figured the “random tangle” button to be something in my own mind–you know, the “Hm, which pattern appeals to me right now?” ‘button’? Just me, I guess, being a bit goofy.

    There are so many things to look at around us, whether enjoyable or otherwise, the “random tangle” ‘buttons’ are ever present. Choose tangle patterns based on something like a favorite food. For instance, one of the most interesting tangles I’ve come up with was based solely on Chocolate Chip Cookies. Three patterns from the “C” part of the alpha section here on Linda’s site–one C for each letter in Chocolate Chip cookies–and then, because they were my late father’s favorite cookie, I also chose the first letter of his first name. Made for a very interesting combination of patterns when I was done.

    Another thing to do is to tangle all the patterns found under one letter–all the “A” patterns, for instance–because you’ll either have to have long line of tiles by the time you’re done, or you’ll be innovative and use other surfaces.

    The randomnicity of choosing pattern is “simple science,” not rocket science. Base it on the thousands of things that go on in your life–unless one is living a life of an ascetic, there has to be a lot going on, hence a lot of pattern names to choose from!

    Seriously, try it; you’ll be amazed at the sheer number of patterns you can combine in just one sitting–or keep it monotangle, still done on one letter, but in different ways and angles. Otherwise, as my late Mom used to say, “If you can’t think of something enjoyable to do (or draw, in this instance), there’s always housework to do”!

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