What is Zentangle?
Linda Farmer, Certified Zentangle Teacher

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How to draw HUGGINS

Zentangle pattern: Huggins. Image © Linda Farmer and TanglePatterns.com. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. You may use this image for your personal non-commercial reference only. The unauthorized pinning, reproduction or distribution of this copyrighted work is illegal.Huggins is a Zentangle®-original tangle pattern from co-founders Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas.

It is one of several tangles resembling weaving that are great fun to draw.

A variant of Huggins is W2 (Warp and Weft), drawn using squares instead of the dots of the first step, connected with straight lines instead of curved ones.

CZT Vicki Murray’s site with the instructions for drawing Huggins no longer exists. For your convenience, here is my illustration of the steps.

If you draw your initial dots in Step 1 larger than what I’ve shown here, it creates a more open weave. Shading adds the final touch to achieve the 3D woven effect.

How to draw the official tangle pattern HUGGINS

Image copyright the artist and used with permission, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Please feel free to refer to the step outs to recreate this tangle in your Zentangles and ZIAs, or link back to this page. However the artist and TanglePatterns.com reserve all rights to these images and they should not be pinned, reproduced or republished. Thank you for respecting these rights.

Check out the tag zentangle for more Zentangle®-original tangles on TanglePatterns.com.

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If you're new to Zentangle® and tangling, my TanglePatterns.com BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO ZENTANGLE is just what you need to get started. Also available en Français and en Español.
Zentangle Primer Volume 1 Remember you can get your official Zentangle supplies here too, including the fabulous new Zentangle PRIMER Vol 1. It's your CZT-in-a-book by the founders of Zentangle®! Visit the STORE tab on the top menu bar or click on the image. For more about the content and to read the rave reviews, visit the BOOK REVIEWS tab.
"Absolutely the best Zentangle Book yet! As an accomplished artist I used to think I did not need instruction on this art form. How wrong I was! My tangling improved by leaps and bounds after reading this book. If you think you have Zentangle down then you need this book more than ever!" ~ Kris H
The Official Zentangle Kit Another great jump-starter for new tanglers is the original Official Zentangle Kit. The Kit includes all the supplies you'll need to get started properly: Sakura Micron Pens, Zentangle Tiles, pencil, sharpener, tortillion, a booklet and an instructional DVD by co-founder Maria Thomas. Click on the image for more information about the Kit and its contents.

 

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8 comments to How to draw HUGGINS

  • Kim Gabriel

    I struggled with W2 and I mean struggled. But after I “got” Huggins, I was able to do W2. I have to hand it to Vicki: she is the one who revealed the mystery of weaving and Shattuck to me. Hooray for Vicki!

    Neither Vicki nor Suzanne McNeill (who gives steps for W2) give explicit instructions for beginning the “down” connection. And it took me a while before I realized it is a simple formula. In case it helps anybody, think of the horizontal line connectors as marching up, down, up, down, the up and down being relative to the squares or circles they are joining. Adjacent lines mirror this alternating connection. So, two horizontal rows would read
    1. up, down, up, down, up, down
    2. down, up, down, up, down, up

    When you go to start the vertical connections, the pattern is inside, outside, inside, outside relative to the circles or squares. And the trick is, if the horizontal connector is up, the vertical connector is inside. Carry on the pattern from there. If the horizontal connector is down, the vertical connector is outside. This works at any point in the pattern (good to know for continuing the pattern in odd little nooks and crannies).

    That looks TERRIFYING in print because it takes so long to explain but you can readily “see” it with just a couple of lines of example and prove it to yourself.

    P.S. If you start off the vertical incorrectly, you might just want to carry on because the resulting variant is actually quite pleasing.

    • Linda Farmer

      Thanks for sharing, Kim. I’m sure it will help out a lot of folks. This is definitely one of those patterns that requires total concentration.

  • Scott

    I try and I try but I can not get this down:/

    • Linda Farmer

      For many tangle patterns, one of the “secrets” is to be sure to turn your tile as you work.

      So with this one, try doing all the horizontal lines first – Kim’s “up, down” tip helps with that.

      Then turn the tile 90 degrees, and you’ve got horizontal lines to deal with again. It does require your full deliberate attention to each stroke.

      Hope this helps! Keep trying, once you get it the “ah hah” moment is worth it.

  • Kim Gabriel

    Sorry to hear of your troubles. I assure you I had reams of pages of mangled Huggins before it finally clicked for me.

    I have just read my post above and it reads like gobbledy gook so I won’t refer you to it but I can tell you that this is one of those ones you really have to deconstruct in your own mind–it had to “click” for me before I could do it, I couldn’t even just imitate it.

    good luck!!!!!! Please let us know if you crack it.

  • this pattern need a lot of concentration and i need a lot of help

  • Shannon Paul

    I also had a horrible time with this one, and it finally clicked after trying many, many, many times.

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