How to sign up for a free subscription - never miss a tangle!
What is Zentangle?
Linda Farmer, Certified Zentangle Teacher

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

All contents of this website are Copyright © 2010 - 2021 Linda Farmer, TanglePatterns.com, and artists where named. Copying content in any form other than for your own personal offline reference and inspiration is expressly prohibited. No content may be reproduced, pinned or republished without express written permission. Commercial use of any content is prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Artists for Respect
Your support helps keep TanglePatterns available!

RANDOM SELECTOR

Use this Random Tangle Selector with your TanglePatterns.com TANGLE GUIDE to help you select tangles. See Pages 7 and 9 of the Guide for instructions. You can also use this to select random Strings: simply pop in any number in the range of 1 to 250.

RECENT COMMENTS

ARCHIVES

How to draw MIZZLE

Zentangle pattern: Mizzle. Image © Linda Farmer and TanglePatterns.com. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. You may use this image for your personal non-commercial reference only. The unauthorized pinning, reproduction or distribution of this copyrighted work is illegal.Well G’Day once again my friends and welcome to the merry month of December. Well, we can hope 🙂

German tangler Indrani Novello’s playful Mizzle tangle is perfect for this month’s holiday themed occasions.

Indrani writes,

I do like my flora-based tangles, and this one is inspired by the mistletoe plant.

As a tangle it is a close relative of both “Pendrills” and Rick’s version of “Flux“.

And while it is a take on a Christmas-tradition plant I think this one is not holiday-specific and will be a nice one to do year round. I can see it making colourful additions to ZIAs or renaissance tiles.

Have fun exploring it.

mistletoe-berries

Mistletoe with berries. Image by Hans Braxmeier from Pixabay

According to the Woodland Trust,

Mistletoe is a familiar Christmas staple, soaked in folklore and midwinter tradition. But where does it grow and how can you find it in the wild?

Mistletoe grows in the branches of trees such as hawthorn, poplar and lime, although in the UK the most common hosts are cultivated apple trees. Despite growing on trees, mistletoe is not generally found in a woodland setting, preferring hosts in open situations with plenty of light.

The National Wildlife Federation explains,

Often used as a symbol of renewal because it stays green all winter, mistletoe is famed for its stolen-kisses power. But the plant also is important to wildlife, and it may have critical value for humans, too. Extracts from mistletoe — newly used in Europe to combat colon cancer, the second greatest cause of cancer death in Europe and the Americas — show signs of being more effective against cancer, and less toxic to humans, than standard chemotherapy.

Among the many interesting facts in the NWF article:

  • There are 1,300 mistletoe species worldwide. The continental United States and Canada are home to more than 30 species, and Hawaii harbors another six.
  • Trees infested with mistletoe die early because of the parasitic growth, producing dead trees useful to nesting birds and mammals. A mistletoe-infested forest may produce three times more cavity-nesting birds than a forest lacking mistletoe.
  • When a mistletoe seed lands on a suitable host, it sends out roots that penetrate the tree and draw on its nutrients and water. Mistletoes also can produce energy through photosynthesis in their green leaves.
  • As they mature, mistletoes grow into thick, often rounded masses of branches and stems until they look like baskets, sometimes called “witches’ brooms,” which can reach 5-feet wide and weigh 50 pounds.
  • Mistletoes produce white berries, each containing one sticky seed that can attach to birds and mammals for a ride to new growing sites. The ripe white berries of dwarf mistletoe, native to the western United States and Canada, also can explode, ejecting seeds at an initial average speed of 60 miles per hour and scattering them as far as 50 feet.
  • The mistletoe’s white berries are toxic to humans but are favored during autumn and winter — when other foods are scarce — by mammals ranging from deer and elk to squirrels, chipmunks and porcupines. Many bird species, such as robins, chickadees, bluebirds, and mourning doves, also eat the berries.

So don’t eat the berries! There’s more in the article, check it out!

And why do we kiss under the mistletoe? The History Channel explains here.

Indrani illustrates the step-by-step instructions for drawing Mizzle below and she includes it in a tile with the Zentangle®-original Jetties and Antonine Megger’s fun CO2.

How to draw the Zentangle pattern Mizzle, tangle and deconstruction by Indrani Novello. Image copyright the artist and used with permission, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Image copyright the artist and used with permission, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. These images are for your personal offline reference only. Please feel free to refer to the images to recreate this tangle in your personal Zentangles and ZIAs. However the artist and TanglePatterns.com reserve all rights to the images and they must not be publicly pinned, altered, reproduced or republished. Thank you for respecting these rights. “We must all face the choice between what is right and what is easy.” ~ Albus Dumbledore

As you enjoy any of the tangles on the site, please leave a comment of thanks and encouragement to show the artists you appreciate them for sharing their creativity to inspire yours. Your thanks helps motivate them to continue to share! And please share a link to your favorite tangles on social media. Thanks!

Check out the tag indranin for more of Indrani’s tangles on TanglePatterns.com.

Related Links

  • Looking for tangles by Artist or Type? For details visit the ABOUT > HOW TO FIND TANGLES BY ARTIST OR TYPE page on the top menu bar of any page on the site.
  • What is a Zentangle? — if you are new to the Zentangle Method, start here for the fundamentals
  • Zentangle terminology — a glossary of terms used in this art form
  • Linda's List of Zentangle-Original Patterns — here is the complete list of original tangles (aka "official tangles") created and introduced by founders Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas, including those not published online. If you are new to the Zentangle Method I highly recommend learning a few of the published Zentangle classics first.
  • A pattern is not always a tangle — here's what makes a tangle. TIP: a tangle NEVER starts with pencil planning.
  • How to submit your pattern deconstruction to TanglePatterns
  • For lots of great FREE tutorials on TanglePatterns, click on the TUTORIALS link in the pink alphabetic menu bar below the tangle images at the top of any page
  • Strings! Have we got STRINGS! Click on the STRINGS link in the pink alphabetic menu bar below the tangle images at the top of any page for 250 different (free) Zentangle-starters. More than enough for any lifetime!

.oOo.

Enhance your Zentangle experience while supporting TanglePatterns:

CURRENT EDITION! TanglePatterns.com TANGLE GUIDE, 2021 Edition

TanglePatterns.com TANGLE GUIDE, 2021 Edition

The 10th Edition of the TanglePatterns.com TANGLE GUIDE is an instant-download 90-page interactive digital eBook containing 1,500+ tangles on the site from May 2010 through December 31, 2020. It's a great resource and a must-have digital tool for using the site. Visit the STORE > E-BOOKS page and help keep TanglePatterns.com online by getting your copy now!

"Linda, Thank you! I was relying on too few and getting stuck after 3 years of daily working with Zentangle. This has inspired me to ‘begin again’ with renewed excitement." ~ Barbara R.

See the BOOK REVIEWS page for more details on its features and view a sample page. Note: this is a digital product you download when you place your order, nothing will be physically mailed to you.
GIFT ORDERS FOR ANOTHER PERSON: To give the TANGLE GUIDE as a gift, visit this page to place your gift order.
If you're new to Zentangle® and tangling, my TanglePatterns.com BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO ZENTANGLE is just what you need to get started. Also available en Français and en Español.

Zentangle Primer Volume 1 This is the only Zentangle book you'll ever need: the fabulous Zentangle PRIMER Vol 1. It's your CZT-in-a-book by the founders of Zentangle®. Visit the STORE tab on the top menu bar or click on the image. For more about the content and to read the rave reviews, visit the BOOK REVIEWS tab.
NEW! Now available in KINDLE format for $9.99.
"Absolutely the best Zentangle Book yet! As an accomplished artist I used to think I did not need instruction on this art form. How wrong I was! My tangling improved by leaps and bounds after reading this book. If you think you have Zentangle down then you need this book more than ever!" ~ Kris H

.oOo.

2 comments to How to draw MIZZLE

  • Deborah J Davis

    My first thought was that it looked like mistletoe. Then I read the narrative and – that is what it is supposed to look like. Though we have MUCH mistletoe in some of our oak trees I can still say I do appreciate the delicacy of your tangle. I like it and am sure I will use it. Thank you for sharing it with us.

  • Zuhal Fischer

    Beautiful pattern, thank you

Leave a Reply to Deborah J Davis Cancel reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

  

  

  

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.